Image

Archive for Antique Sussex Pottery

Folk-Art Exhibitions

Crocodile-0-350

Approaching fast is our on-line exhibition of ‘British Folk Art’ reserved for this event in fact enfolded within our treasury of goods is a naive Irish Walking Stick embellished with rural scenes which are carved upon its barrel. Also set aside is an imposing collection of Antique treen. Though currently the most difficult goods to source are antique country furniture items. In this particular genre ‘Antique oak and country furniture’  the very best quality articles are proving extremely elusive. Consequently I have hunting trips planed in Scotland and Wales for April and May where I am anticipating bagging some trophies.

Our on-line exhibition:  BRITISH FOLK ART – a celebration. Begins on the 12th June and will include folk art, antique country furniture, antique treen, naive paintings and antique pottery. All items will be of museum quality and all will be for sale.

This exhibition is scheduled to coincide with the British Folk Art exhibition of ‘ Tate Britain [London,UK] gallery in 2014’

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Football and Folk-Art

Rose Villa Shadow Box

Come June when the world goes flaming made for football, in fact on the very day the World Cup begins, we will be following in the footsteps of Tate Britain by holding an exhibition of British Folk art. Our own cache of treasures will be entitled:-

British Folk Art – a celebration:
Commencing 12th June our online exhibition will include selected folk art, antique country furniture and antique pottery. All items will be of museum quality and will have been sourced throughout the British Isles and all will be for sale.

There will be some exceptional antique treen –  some historically important antique bead-work – some curious and unusual country furniture – and some exceedingly rare English pottery:

In the meantime we will continuing updating our website with the best antique oak and country furniture we can find and replenishing our pottery gallery with the antique slipware and Sussex pottery we are so fond of.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Rye Flagon

Rye Flagon Sussex Pottery
Amongst our collection of Antique Sussex Pottery we have an important documentary Rye Flagon inscribed with the name Moses Roots and dated 1846. This pot would have been made at the Cadborough pottery, Rye by William Mitchell or one of his sons Frederick or Henry; it is inscribed underneath Rye pottery.

It is a known fact that these so called ‘ Harvest wares’ were filled with either beer or cider and on long hot summer days when there was arduous reaping to be done were taken to the field and used to quench the thirst of those working there.

Sometimes such vessels were borrowed from the local pub and some had witty rhymes inscribed upon them reminding the borrower that they needed to be returned at the end of the day. (This on behalf of the landlord was a creative way of drumming up business!)

My initial impression of our Flagon was that it was so elaborate that it must have had some sort of commemorative meaning. So it was a surprise to learn that Moses Roots was listed in the 1841 census as living in Wish Street, Rye where his occupation was given as an agricultural labourer.

Moses was married in Rye on the 21st July 1839 to Caroline Burchett who was the daughter of William Burchett. They had a daughter Victoria Harriett Roots who was born in 1840 – Moses died in 1854.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone