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Archive for Antique English Pottery

Folk-Art Exhibitions

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Approaching fast is our on-line exhibition of ‘British Folk Art’ reserved for this event in fact enfolded within our treasury of goods is a naive Irish Walking Stick embellished with rural scenes which are carved upon its barrel. Also set aside is an imposing collection of Antique treen. Though currently the most difficult goods to source are antique country furniture items. In this particular genre ‘Antique oak and country furniture’  the very best quality articles are proving extremely elusive. Consequently I have hunting trips planed in Scotland and Wales for April and May where I am anticipating bagging some trophies.

Our on-line exhibition:  BRITISH FOLK ART – a celebration. Begins on the 12th June and will include folk art, antique country furniture, antique treen, naive paintings and antique pottery. All items will be of museum quality and all will be for sale.

This exhibition is scheduled to coincide with the British Folk Art exhibition of ‘ Tate Britain [London,UK] gallery in 2014’

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Pottery Aspirations

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Although we have only recently instituted our ‘Pottery Gallery’ it is our desire this year to progress forward by augmenting our collection of antique English pottery. Being January the antique Slipware and Sussex pottery we so love is a bit thin on the ground, but we shall be searching high and low in the next few months to purchase pots interesting in design, colour and form.
Though we are currently fortunate possessing a number of special pieces of Antique English Slipware we are just as keen to buy items in the lower price range – as our Kingdom still appears overcast with economic malaise and it remains a fact of life [although times are gradually improving]  it is still easier to sell something under £1000.00 than over it!

 

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New Pottery Gallery

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We are thrilled to announce that next week we will have a new pottery gallery on our website dedicated to Antique English Pottery.
This new gallery will concentrate on items of English Slipware and Sussex Pottery in particular.
Set aside are a number of new items to celebrate this event. Included amongst these riches are a large candlestick 14″ high. A rustic agate tobacco jar. A Turnip Money-box and a superb carpenters bag in absolutely perfect condition, which was produced by Caroline Mitchell at the Belle Vue Pottery, Rye at the end of the 19th century.

In the future our ‘Main Gallery’ will exhibit Antique Country Furniture, period Oak and examples of British Folk Art which may include Antique needlework, antique pewter, antique treen and antique leatherware. We will also have a new picture gallery which will exhibit our collection of naive paintings.
We would like to take this opportunity of wishing all our readers and customers a Very Happy Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.

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Donyatt Puzzle Jug

Although nobody knows when the first puzzle-jugs were produced, pottery has certainly been made in the Donyatt area since the middle ages.

At the Fitzwilliam museum in Cambridge where they have a substantial collection of Antique English Pottery there is a puzzle-jug of exactly the same form as ours but dated 1571.

If one considers the vast amount of puzzle- jugs that have been made over the centuries this fact in itself illustrates the affection in which they are held by an eccentric, carousing and gameful  English public.

Naïve pottery embellished with scraffito decoration of flowers, trees and birds is how we recognised ‘Donyatt’. Our pot continuing this tradition has not only paired tulips and a bird but its original spout too! It is further enhanced upon its shoulder with a favourite rhyme:-

When this you see remember me

And bear me in your mind

While I am seldom at your house

Speak of me as you find:

Provenance.

This jug was made for William Hurford of the historic Hurford family and is inscribed to its front in a square reserve

W. Hurford  – June 2nd –  1827

It has remained within that family its entire existence and been passed down by decent, until our purchase.

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